Tag Archive | Online Writing

Tweeting drama

Hope you’re all well. I’ve been away a lot recently and writing. A new novel is in the works as is an anthology of short stories. But look here, it’s my collection of poems, all contemporary. Happy reading!

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Tweeting drama

A little bird appears, so innocent, so tempting.

Why not give it a go?

Something new

 

1,2,3. It’s that easy

Now what?

The little bird suggests

 

Soon following new people

Some interesting, others not so

Stalk away, everybody’s at it.

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009FO2CA8

http://www.amazon.co.uk/From-me-to-you-ebook/dp/B009FO2CA8/ref=pd_rhf_ee_p_t_1

Author to author with Kit Domino

 Visiting my blog today is the lovely Kit Domino, author of Every Step of the Way. 

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  1. Born with a pen in your hand or writing came as a shock brigade?

Very definitely with a pen in my hand. I was a sickly child, often away from school and at one stage even having lessons at home too, and thus I used to read a lot. This moved on to my constantly writing stories and had always dreamed of one day writing a book. A dream that came true. At school, my top subject was English and I wrote a lot of articles for the school magazine, usually on pop music! In a later job, the reporter in me led to writing and editing the company magazine.

  1. What inspires you the most when writing?

I would say that music is my main muse. It has always played a part in my life, always being played at home. I was a rock chick of the late 1960s and 70s, my first husband a DJ, and in later years I fell in love with classical music. It’s a great mood enhancer and whenever I’m writing, music is always playing in the background. A single melody or lyric can throw up all sorts of ideas. In all of my books, music is bound into the plot.

  1. How much does real life inspire or shape your writing?

A great deal. In my novel Every Step of the Way the people and locations are very much taken from my childhood in West London. I find people’s background and history fascinating, their lives a rich tapestry which gets interwoven, often subconsciously, into my work. Whilst none of my characters has been an actual portrayal of a particular person, certainly their mannerisms and traits have shaped and formed characters within the books. Places, too, are important: be it a particular location, a house, an island – all these inspire and form an important part.

Things that have happened in my own life also play an integral part. I think most writers would agree with that adage “write what you know”, thus when you have actually experienced something firsthand, had that particularly feeling or emotion, you write with greater clarity. It helps to bring it all alive. It is also cathartic. There is on the backburner of my writing cooker a part biographical story waiting to be written. It needs to be written if only to enable me to put that particular part of my life to bed and lay the ghosts finally to rest.

  1. The dreaded writer’s block, have you been struck with it or blissfully spared?

Indeed I have hit that solid brick wall. Often. Well, I used to, but not now. Over the years I’ve been writing I have found ways to clamber over it. I find I get it more in painting now. I’m an artist, and whilst often I know what I am going to paint, sometimes I just stare at a blank canvas not knowing. The secret is, as it is in writing, to get something down on the page no matter what. That is why I started to write a blog. It gets the creative juices flowing again, like a heavy rainstorm after a period of drought till it all comes tumbling out in a great waterfall of words until you are wading through a quackmire you have to reach in and pull what is worth saving.

  1. Have you ever switched genres, or considered doing so?

I write across several genres, partly through choice, partly through a fortunate series of incidents. I read many different book genres by many different writers but one of my favourites is Barbara Erskine. I love books that step out of the box of everyday life and venture into the world of fantasy and imagination, hence the writing of a timeslip. It’s still rough around the edges but it’s getting there.

There’s little doubt Every Step of the Way, a family saga as well as piece of social history , was influenced by a love of Cathrine Cookson stories and led to my being shortlisted for the Harry Bowling prize. But I don’t want to be just a saga writer. Being intrigued by the paranormal, ghosts and hauntings, one particular TV programme a few years ago shaped the plot for my paranormal, hopefully to be published later this year.

I know it’s said a reader will pounce on any book by a particular writer because they know the type of story they are going to get, but I like to think that isn’t always the case, certainly not for me. Perhaps I am different, but I want to be known as the author who switches genres because she has such a vivid imagination (as my mother used to say). Authors who get pigeon-holed in one genre often find after a while they run out of ideas, of plots and characters. By writing in different genres I know I’m never going to run out of steam, only time.

Books:

Every Step of the Way, published April 2012: http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Kit+domino&x=0&y=0

Website: http://www.kit-domino.com/index.htm

Blog: http://kitdomino.wordpress.com/

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Write or read?

Write, or read?

Could you give up one or the other? Can you ever be a good writer but not read?

‘Would you rather give up writing for the rest of your life but have all the time you wanted for reading… or give up reading for the rest of your life but have all the time you want for writing?’

This is the question Rachelle Gardner asks in a recent post. http://cba-ramblings.blogspot.com/

To me reading and writing go together, no doubt. I cannot see myself giving one up for the other. I’m an avid reader, always has been. I was the child coming home weighed down by my findings at whichever library we lived near at the time. I learned foreign languages through my need to read. I’d pick up whatever I could lay my hands on to satisfy this need.

My children are the same. I read to them the moment I was born. I got funny looks at a time when it was not yet trendy. The result is a house full of books, our cars too. The smallest of journeys is spent with a nose in a book. They read at the table while eating if we let them. My children are bilingual as a result, my daughter has better spelling than French children her age and even older ones. OK, OK, stop bragging, I hear you.

And writing? At school, I hated the constraints imposed by teachers. Write like this, don’t deviate. I went to schools where teachers did not encourage creativity. I was the child who would write and rewrite…changing details until the very last minute.

Then I went to university. I had fantastic teachers there, ones who recognised and encouraged creativity. Life has its ups and downs, some of them delaying me for a while, but deep down I never stopped. The stories are in my head. I used to think I was slightly mad, or worse. Was I normal? What is normal anyway?

These stories have to come out eventually. I still read as I write. I feel torn at times, wanting to finish a book but characters calling me to get on with the story I’m writing. Lucky for me I’m a fast reader and a furious writer. Once the story starts forming in my head, I’m compelled to write it, so hard to stop. So I do amidst the chaos in my life, little blonde heads demanding attention…

All the way to Paris

Natasha may be a fighter but she’s tired. All her life she’s craved affection and recognition. Leaving her abusive childhood behind she found herself in California.

Back in England she eventually marries on the rebound, only she doesn’t realise this at the time. She becomes a mum and finds a new side of her. With her new baby comes along a surge of confidence, instinct guides her.

Her life may not have the “happy ever after” ending found in romances but she’s reasonably happy.

When, after many miscarriages she gives birth to her son, it throws her mummy skills overboard. Time to relearn everything. Just when she thinks she’s got it all together again, she gets pregnant. She’s overjoyed, her husband throws a fit.

Severe illness breaks her, one more ambulance trip and it’s almost over. She survives, but loses her baby and her will to live. For a short moment she wishes she had died too, until two little blonde heads remind her of all the love they need.

So, she fights, she must live, however tired she is of fighting. Just for once, she’d like somebody to come and mother her, look after her.

Until one December afternoon her life takes on another twist, a blast from the past, leading her all the way to Paris.

 


Lost in your time, my new novel, based in Paris  

Out on the 28th March

Novelist meets French rock star, prepare for the sparkles.

 


Rock star or husband – which would you choose?

 

Ah, the dangers of the internet! We’ve all been warned, but do we take notice?

When Natasha clicks on a link, her whole life is turned upside down. A flash from the past, a chance meeting with a gorgeous French rock star…

A chance to start over and forget the pain and misery from the last two years.

But can Natasha let go? Will she accept this new twist in her life?

Come back tomorrow for launch news and contest!

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All writing is personal

 

 

 

 

My humble opinion, of course. When we write, we project our own opinions, our feelings, the way we see the world and in some cases we strip ourselves, sharing our most intimate feelings.

All of this goes to varying degrees but nobody will write the same story, even if given the same bones to play with, unless you bring in the plagiarists…

Today I was the guest on this great blog, yes, I know, novel coming out on the 28th March, time to get talking. Please visit and read my interview and find out how personal my writing really is.I’m sure Melissa would be delighted if you’d leave her a comment.

Thanks again to Melissa, she loves all things written and so do I.

Blog tour interview with There for you

Lost in your time

Novelist meets French rock star, prepare for the sparkles.

 


Rock star or husband – which would you choose?

 

Ah, the dangers of the internet! We’ve all been warned, but do we take notice?

When Natasha clicks on a link, her whole life is turned upside down. A flash from the past, a chance meeting with a gorgeous French rock star…

A chance to start over and forget the pain and misery from the last two years.

But can Natasha let go? Will she accept this new twist in her life?

 

Nowhere Left to Hide on Amazon UK

 

“A heartfelt tale, told with a deft touch” novelist Rowan Coleman.

 

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