Tag Archive | english

What he said…

Forever may not be long enough,”says Matthieu to Natasha in my new novel, Lost in your time.

He’s French and he doesn’t take no for an answer. Impossible is also denied.

So, will the sparks fizz out? Or will Natasha fall for the forever concept?

 

“Forever is the most dizzying word in the English language. The idea of staying in one place forever was like standing at the border of a foreign country, peering over the fence and trying to imagine what life might be like on the other side, and life on the other side was frankly unimaginable.”

Emily St John Mandel ( Last night in Montreal)

What’s your take ? 

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Forever may not be long enough

“Forever is the most dizzying word in the English language. The idea of staying in one place forever was like standing at the border of a foreign country, peering over the fence and trying to imagine what life might be like on the other side, and life on the other side was frankly unimaginable.”

Emily St John Mandel ( Last night in Montreal)

St George’s Day or the importance of being English

St George’s day is celebrated on the 23 April and is England‘s National Day.Will our “green and pleasant” land be awash with parties and celebrations ? Not likely.

St George is the patron saint of England and a myriad of other countries.In ancient times, it was a major celebration until its popularity diminished.
National celebrations are a big event all over the world, yet, in , , it’s not even a bank holiday.People actually bemoan this fact but other than that, most English people aren’t fussed or interested in celebrating.
This used to surprise me.I was an expat child and thus I’ve lived in various countries all over the world.
Australia has Australia Day, a day (or more) of joyous celebrations.France has Bastille day and of course I always remember fondly the 4th of July parties I’ve been invited to.
So what am I? English, of course, even tough I used to refer to myself as British as a child.I still dither between the two, sometimes saying English, other times British, depending on where I am and who I’m with.